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Posts Tagged ‘Yoga Sutras’

So Hum Meditation with Sri Dharma Mittra

Posted on September 7th, 2015 by Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Sri Dharma Mittra explains the So Hum meditation. So Hum is said to be the mantra that we are born with. It is the mantra of the breath. In many traditions this will be the first mantra that a student is given, because as it were, he or she already has access to it. It is said that the mantra can be heard if you listen closely to the sound of the breath. Using this simple technique can bring a sense of clarity, balance, ease and even bliss. If you are interested in beginning a practice of Japa meditation this is a great practice to begin with. The word Japa means repetition and usually refers to the repetition of a mantra.  Once you are comfortable with this simple practice it may be time to move on to other practices that use this mantra following the breath like Ajapa Japa meditation part one. At some point you may even begin to notice the sound of the mantra repeating itself. This is a great sign that you are beginning to embody the resonance of the mantra.

This clip is from Dharma Mittra’s Maha Sadhana level 2 DVD from Pranamaya. Use the Promo code SACREDCOW for 10% at checkout.



Can Yoga Heal a Broken Heart?

Posted on January 15th, 2015 by Both comments and pings are currently closed.

There are many ways that we become heartbroken. It can be from years of failed relationships, a betrayal from a partner, the loss of a loved one, divorce, abandonment, disappointment, even loneliness. Some of our heartbreaks are so deep that it feels as though we may never recover. We become so disconnected from ourselves that we need something to guide us back to wholeness.

All too often, we search for something or someone outside of ourselves to make us happy. But those of us who have tried that route have no-doubt experienced the fleeting happiness that is born from a relationship incubated in a bubble of neediness. It is our relationship to ourselves and the understanding of who we really are that will bring us that feeling of completeness and the knowledge that we are never truly alone.

The Yoga Sutras describe a light that resides inside each of us—a luminance that is beyond all sorrow. This light is said to be located at the heart center. If we can access that light by letting go of resistance, offering gratitude, and surrendering to what is, we can once again—and maybe for the first time—taste our true nature, one that is full of joy, freedom, and bliss.

The process of accessing that light requires svadyaya (self-study), abhyasa (diligent practice) and vairagya (dispassion). We have to muster the courage to walk through the fire of transformation, and we should begin by making a sacred commitment to ourselves toward our own healing.

But first, we must learn to become still. Stillness is probably the one thing we’d like to avoid. Busyness keeps us distracted from our issues and the pain at heart. Perpetual motion is a great tool to avoid seeing our patterns, ways we could have acted more wisely or compassionately. It staves off those voices of doubt in our minds that maybe we actually are unlovable or underserving and might always be alone. It seemingly keeps us from feeling the pain. But it’s still there, under the surface, bubbling away, deciding whether to burst forth and release or sink deep and create toxicity and dis-ease. At the end of the day it only serves to keep our healing at bay.

We need to stop our endless television watching, web surfing, overworking, and the countless coffees with friends who just want to cheer us up or rehash the story over and over as they project their own relationship woes onto us.

Even our asana practice can become a way to distract ourselves. However, if we turn off the music and infuse our asana practice with the subtler aspects of yoga like pranayama, mantra, and bandhas, we can use it to prepare us for deep meditation. From this place, we can begin to pry open the door to the cave of the heart.

It is said that, in the stillness, the unknown becomes known. It may be scary to look into those painful and cavernous places within ourselves. But it must be done if we want to be free.

Make the decision now to take your seat, close your eyes, be with yourself, and breathe. Being still will illuminate your inner world, and how you experience the outer world will be shifted. But the practice of meditation is much more powerful when you practice daily. If possible, do it in the same place at the same time every day, and you will see that the cumulative power of a daily practice becomes palpable very quickly.

Here are some things that will help you to move your healing journey forward:
1. Practice non-expectation
2. Observe silence for at least 30 minutes before bed
3. Reduce your media intake
4. Take time to be alone


Q&A: Nischala Joy Devi Offers a Woman’s Perspective on the Yoga Sutras

Posted on May 17th, 2011 by Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.

yoga teacher femaleNischala Joy Devi is a master yoga teacher and healer. She has developed many yoga programs that serve those with life-challenging illnesses, and her teachings emphasize the practice of compassion. She authored two books: The Healing Path of Yoga (on yoga therapy) and The Secret Power of Yoga (a female-centered interpretation of the Yoga Sutras, also made into a CD). She talked to The Sacred Cow about the importance of including a heart-centered—and female—perspective in one’s yoga studies.  Read More »»


What Makes Yoga Yoga?

Posted on March 2nd, 2011 by Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.

dhyana yogaI have a friend who doesn’t practice yoga. But he insists that running is his yoga. He gets up early in the morning, runs long distances, focuses on his breath and the movements of his body, and goes into deep states of meditation. Another friend says that when he lifts weights, he listens to his heartbeat between reps and enters a sort of trance state during his workout. And a musician friend tells me that  when she plays, she feels like she becomes one with the music. So, my question is: Are they all doing a form of yoga? Read More »»


Is Yoga For the Rich?

Posted on January 30th, 2011 by Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.

find a yoga studio

Twenty dollar classes. Swanky studios with extensive boutiques selling $90 yoga pants. Conferences and conventions and retreats that cost half a month’s salary. Yoga can be really expensive. But while many are peeved by the commercialization of yoga, hasn’t it always primarily been a thing for the rich? Read More »»